Becoming couth

Cocktails in the UWS, NYC

Like everyone else, we got caught up in the lottery fever.

Her: Shoot, our Powerball was “24” and the last winning Powerball was “24.”
Me: So we have ten tickets that have the same Powerball as the last winning ticket? I’ll just grab a quick-pick.
Her: (later) So? What’s our new Powerball number?
Me: 24.

Got good luck nor bad luck; just strange luck. This time, didn’t even win a dollar.

———-

Me: It’s nice spending time together.
Her: Yeah, in the five minutes you’re not on your computer.
Me: Three minutes. I have deadlines.

HG and I found time recently to chill out and watch Food Inc. It should be required viewing for all Americans – we really are too far removed from our food.

We also saw this flick called The Double, which we really enjoyed but got critically panned. On a related note, we struggled to get through The Descendents and have zero interest in The Artist.

We’ve come to this conclusion: those films that are critically acclaimed, we just don’t find all that interesting while the films that critics hate, we seem to enjoy.

Evidently, we’re uncouth.

How does one become more couth?

Location: running all over the joint
Mood: finally not sick
Music: wanna pillowfight in the middle of the night
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6 thoughts on “Becoming couth”

    1. I just didn\’t think it looked interesting enough to plop down $30 for a showing. The other thing is that – from what I read – it sounded an awful lot like \”Singing in the Rain,\” which I enjoyed as is and didn\’t feel the need to re-watch.

  1. saw "food inc" when it came out, and it really changed me. . .not just in terms of how i feel about what i eat (even as a vegetarian, i'm not immune to the poisoning that goes on in our food supply), but also in my recognition of the "little guys" out there who are get shafted by the gov't & companies like monsanto.

    no need to see "the artist," just queue up a real silent film instead.

    1. That's a bit how I felt; I heard a lot about Monsanto in the past but I didn't really ever consider they amount of pressure they could – and do – put on smaller entities like those shown in the film.

      Really an eye-opener. And yes, I agree with your Artist comment as well. Seems a bit contrived to me.

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